in Life

Game of Chess

 

Today my boyfriend took me out to brunch. I got to pick out the location. It was my suggestion that we try out a spot, that seemed to be a hole in the wall – since I previously visited earlier in the week with my accountability partner.

I got to pick out the location. It was my suggestion that we try out a spot – since I previously visited earlier in the week with my accountability partner.

It’s actually a really nice cozy cafe and they have really good crepes.

While we waited for our brunch meals, we played the game of chess.

It’s been a while since I’ve last played the game and he wasn’t familiar with the game at all. We looked up the rules and I found some insight in roles each piece represents. There are many principles we can draw from the game of chess and apply them to life.

My boyfriend began to read the rules out loud:

The King

” The King is the most important chess piece on the chessboard. If he is checkmated the game is over!

The Queen

The Queen is often considered the most powerful chess piece on the chessboard. She is placed next to the king, on her own color. The game is not over when she is lost, but if your opponent has a Queen and you do not, you may find yourself at a considerable disadvantage!

Like the King, the Queen can move in any direction. However, she is not limited to just one space – she can move any number of spaces in any direction, as long as she is not obstructed by another chess piece (see the diagram) Of course if that obstruction is an opposing chess piece, she is free to capture it!”

 

After he read the role of the queen I began to think about women in marriage, friendships we surround ourselves with, and acquaintances we come across or are extended in our circle. It is the wife’s’ duty to protect the king, Her mate – and vice a verse.  If she is “captured” the king is at risk of also being captured.

My boyfriend and I played two rounds. In the first game, he was willing to sacrifice his pawns too easily – but to be fair he just learned the rules. In the second round, he played much more skillfully. When I became cocky, he stole my knight, and it made me realize I had to anticipate his moves.

In the first game, he was willing to sacrifice his pawns too easily – but to be fair he just learned the rules. In the second round, he played much more skillfully. When I became cocky, he stole my knight, and it made me realize I had to anticipate his moves.

Though it’s been a while since I’ve last played chess, it gave me a reminder that you need to have a good support system in place.

The pawns are important, though they are often the first to be sacrificed. Don’t underestimate the Rook, the bishop can be a piece that is undervalued, and by all means, keep the queen alive.

 

Oh and babe, don’t worry, I won’t tell the world that I got all your pieces in the second game. LOL!!!

 

Too bad I don’t have proof of the second game – but I’m no expert in the game of chess. Can’t wait to play again and challenge your thinking even more.


*To see the full list of Rules visit http://www.chessusa.com/chess-rules.html – no copyright infringement intended.

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